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Genre
Drama, Romance
Regie
Dominic Cooke
Dauer
110
FSK
12
Land
GB
Jahr
2017

On Chesil Beach


The overwhelming English sadness of Ian McEwan’s novella On Chesil Beach has been transferred to the movie screen, adapted by the author and directed with scrupulous sensitivity and care by Dominic Cooke, known for his stage work and making his feature film debut here. It is a tender and valuable film, well acted, with a shrewd eye for how naive you can be in your early 20s, how impatient, how pompous, how tragicomically un-self-aware.

It is the story of Florence and Edward, young university graduates getting married in 1962. She is a talented and ambitious classical musician from a well-to-do family and he is a clever young man from humbler origins. Both have first-class degrees and, in consequence, no small opinion of themselves. They go as virgins to the marriage bed in a way that was quite normal then and all but unimaginable now. The setting is a horribly conventional seaside hotel on Chesil Beach in Dorset, whose wild and windblown expanse is in grim contrast to their own corseted timidity and ignorance. Its loneliness is, however, appropriate enough, and Cooke and cinematographer Sean Bobbitt contrive a moment in which they look marooned on that beach, as if washed up from some disaster.

The guardian